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Noonan’s Notes Blog

About This Blog

Noonan’s Notes Blog is written by a team of Hodgson Russ tax attorneys led by the blog’s namesake, Tim Noonan. Noonan’s Notes Blog regularly provides analysis of and commentary on developments in the world of New York and multistate tax law. Noonan's Notes Blog is a winner of CreditDonkey's Best Tax Blogs Award 2017.

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Timothy Noonan 
Ariele Doolittle
Joseph Endres
Daniel Kelly
Elizabeth Pascal 
Craig Reilly
Andrew Wright 

Showing 4 posts from February 2019.

Can New York Continue to Ignore the Wynne Case?

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Is New York’s taxation of statutory residents unconstitutional? Those who follow state and local tax developments (and readers of this blog) may know that Hodgson Russ has been litigating that question in two parallel cases, Chamberlain and Edelman (past coverage here and here). Both cases hone in on whether the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2015 decision in Comptroller v. Wynne upends New York’s prior precedent on this issue in Tamagni v. Tax Appeals Tribunal, requiring a new constitutional analysis. We think so, and that under an analysis consistent with Wynne, the double taxation faced by people domiciled outside of New York but taxed as statutory residents unconstitutionally burdens and discriminates against interstate commerce.

A Pied-à-terre Tax in New York City?

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According to a recent New York Times article, hedge-fund billionaire Kenneth C. Griffin purchased a $238 million apartment in January 2019 located at 220 Central Park South, making it the most expensive residential sale in United States history. Even in Manhattan, where huge real estate sales are downright routine, Griffin, founder and chief executive of the global investment firm Citadel, has managed to set a new record on an unfinished piece of property,  a purchase that surpassed the cost of the next most expensive purchase by more than $100 million.

Sports Team Owners Strike-Out with Pass-Through Deduction

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This article originally appeared in Law360 and is reprinted with permission.

Much of the fanfare around last year’s federal tax reform was around the special 20% deduction applicable to income from flow-through entities like partnerships, S corporations and LLCs under IRC § 199A. But the new law generated more questions than answers, requiring the IRS to issue new regulations to help taxpayers and practitioners sort through all the details. Just recently, the IRS issued final regulations, and they came with some bad news for owners of your favorite sports team. Specifically, the new regulations confirm that sports team ownership falls within the definition of “athletics” and, therefore, is a disqualified activity, meaning team owners generally will be unable to qualify for the 20% deduction with respect to income generated from the team. In this post, we’ll explain what all the fuss is about.

NY Tax Minutes: Wayfair, Executive Budget, Goldman Offshore

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This article originally appeared in Law360 and is reprinted with permission.

The New Year is in full swing here at “NY Tax Minutes,” and we’re sticking with our resolution to deliver all the month’s New York City and state tax news in a way that’s made for New Yorkers. Fast.

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